Additional Material


A large scale, unique woodcut by Matthew Colaizzo

September 17th, 2016

We are pleased to share a dramatic new work by this Philadelphia native.  Colaizzo’s work focuses on landscapes that blur the line between natural and unnatural. It contextualizes man’s mark on the earth with a broad view of nature. It involves ideas about natural history, cosmos, human progress, mystery, and spirit.

This large (36 x 96″), work was made by using multi-block woodcuts printed by hand to create landscapes that are inspired by the coal industry’s mark in Northeastern Pennsylvania. The scarred earth and mountains of coal are evidence of “human progress,” symbolizing man’s relationship with the earth, trying to seize and conquer it for our own benefit rather than relish in its mysteries.  With A Place on Earth, Matt takes inspiration from a contemporary landworks project– a highway rebuilding site that is both immediate and seemingly far removed from a densely populated city.


Matthew Colaizzo, A Place on Earth, 2015, unique woodcut

A Place on Earth, 2015

Alfred Bendiner’s Philadelphia

July 28th, 2016

Alfred Bendiner’s “And So I Give You Our Candidate and the Next President of the United States of America” 1948 captures the energy of convention week then and now in Philadelphia. Bendiner was trained as an architect but is better known as a celebrated cartoonist for the Philadelphia Bulletin known for his wry humor and social commentary. One can only imagine what he’d make of our 2016 presidential race.

This work was made in 1948 when both the Democratic Party Convention and the G.O.P. Convention were both held in Philadelphia.  We believe the wreathed candidate is Thomas Dewey, who famously lost to Harry Truman and became one of our most admired presidents.

We have an excellent selection of works by Bendiner (1899-1964).  Please ask for more images or, even better, come visit to see them face to face.

And So I Give You Our Candidate, 1948

And So I Give You Our Candidate, 1948

New works on paper by Nona Hershey

March 1st, 2016

Nona Hershey continues to explore cloud imagery.  Her newest drawings juxtapose the ephemeral nature of clouds with flat color in highly formal patterns.  Grids of bright act in opposition to the soft gray atmospheric tones and then bring to mind abstracted farmed fields.  Nona’s choice of spectral colors to bring to mind the phenomenon of rainbows.

Weather patterns and wave lengths have appeared earlier works and linger within these fresh new drawings to evoke land and sky in a fresh and surprising way.

Nona Hershey Unsettled 2015 graphite powdery & gouache

Unsettled 2015

watercolor paintings & lithographs by Robert Riggs

February 16th, 2016

We are pleased to offer an excellent selection of watercolors and lithographs by Robert Riggs (1896-1970).  Riggs was one of the greatest artist-illustrators when publishing supported illustrators on a large scale.  Riggs’ success enabled him to travel around the world in the mid-1920s and included a stop in Algeria where he made our group of watercolor paintings.  Upon returned to Philadelphia he immersed himself in making lithographs, part of what he considered “dry medium”.  He began working with printer Theodore Cuno but soon decided he required a more experimental collaborator and found his way to George Miller in New York.  Riggs’ lithographs are held by museum collections throughout the USA and in England.  His subjects were the circus—he attended every performance when Barnum & Baileys set up their show in Philadelphia and befriended the performers.  Boxing was his other great passion.  Riggs produced images that put the viewer up close to the action if not in the ring.

Clown Acrobats, On the Ropes, Club Fighter & Bou Saada, Algeria lithographs and a watercolor by Robert Riggs

Clown Acrobats, On the Ropes, Club Fighter & Bou Saada, Algeria

Rare Modernist intaglio works by Helen Phillips

October 20th, 2015

American sculptor and print maker Helen Phillips born 1913, Fresno, California.  She studied at the School of Fine Art in San Francisco and learned direct carving techniques from Ralph Stackpole, who introduced her to Diego Rivera but Phillips was more excited by Oceanic and Pre-Columbian art than Social Realism.    Phillips won Phelan Traveling Fellowship which allowed her to work in Paris in 1936.   There, she entered Atelier 17, the intaglio print workshop where she met it’s founder and future husband, Stanley William Hayter. Learning to engrave copper in Paris had an important impact on the development of her sculpture, forcing her to become conscious of negative space.  She fled to New York in 1939 and became a pioneer of the New York School, exhibiting with Wilfredo Lam, Roberto Matta, David Hare, Isamu Noguchi and Arshile Gorky.
Phillips’s sculpture and intaglio prints are in the permanent collections of the Albright Knox Gallery,  Peggy Guggenheim, Venice,  Dallas Museum of Art, Smithsonian American Art Museum, San Diego Museum of Art. San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, MOMA, New York, DeYoung Museum, San Francisco, Princeton University Art Museum and the Victoria and Albert Museum, London.  She died in New York in 1995.

Helen Phillips, Danseuses, c. 1959 and Saltimbanques, 1954

Danseuses, c. 1959 and Saltimbanques, 1954

A new drawing by Tom Roese

August 7th, 2015

Tom Roese recently made a visit to Israel and as he never stops thinking about what he sees, he made this drawing when returned to his studio.  What at first seems to be a keenly observed view of urban housing soon becomes something much more complex.  Quietly modulated color and a cadence of architectural forms reward a careful look at this masterful drawing.  We will exhibit this and other recent drawings at the Cleveland Museum of Art’s 31st Annual Fine Print Fair, a benefit for the museum’s Prints and Drawings collections organized by the Print Club of Cleveland.

Tom Roese, Israel 2015

Israel 2015

Atelier 17 in New York, meet and marry

June 25th, 2015

We enjoyed a recent visit with artist Ellen (Abbey) Countey.  Ellen was born in Brooklyn, NY in 1923 and studied with William Zorach at the Art Students League. She is the model for Zorach’s 1942 marble bust, Quest, now at the Wichita Art Museum.  Ellen made the complex and beautiful engraving, Scattered Journey, in 1946 in New York at Atelier 17.  It came to us from Stanley William Hayter’s private collection of works by friends and artists who worked at Atelier 17, which is where Ellen met her husband, Edward Countey.  The Counteys remained in contact with Hayter and Ellen made more engravings at Atelier 17 in Paris in June of 1986.  It was there she met Margo Dolan and Peter Maxwell while they were visiting Hayter’s studio.  A few months later Ellen wrote asking about our Joseph Hecht (1891-1951) catalog.  Hecht introduced Hayter to engraving and they remained close throughout Hecht’s life.

Edward Countey (1921-1984), studied with Moses Soyer at the New School of Art in New York from 1938-42.   He served in the US Army Signal Photographic Corps in New Guinea in 1942-45.  Countey received a 3 year fellowship to study with Stanley William Hayter at Atelier 17 in New York shortly after his return.  He assisted Hayter and Jess Paley in producing the educational film, “New Ways of Gravure” and he drew the animated film, “Attack”, for the Signal Corp.  “Attack”  is part of film collection at MOMA.  Countey’s engravings were exhibited internationally with a show organized from MOMA’s collection and had two solo exhibitions in New York.  He later taught at SUNY Stony Brook in the engineering Department and subsequently in the Department of Art.  Countey’s Paw Paw, 1949, is a large and ambitious work with engraving, etching and stenciled color.  An impression was acquired by MOMA in 1949 and it was included in MOMA’s exhibition, “Some American Prints, 1945-50”.  Our impression also belonged to  Hayter, as did Countey’s Apollo.

One of the great joys of what we do is sharing the stories that are behind the works of art.

Engravings, Scattered Journey by Ellen (Abbey) Countey and Paw Paw by Edward Countey

Scattered Journey by Ellen (Abbey) Countey and Paw Paw by Edward Countey

Elizabeth Catlett (American, 1915-2012)

April 27th, 2015

We are proud to share here an important bronze, El Canto, 1968.  Catlett has taken cues from traditional West African sculpture while creating an iconic, Modern work.  Her works impress with the strength of her formal approach yet Catlett was more interested in the social power they convey: “I have always wanted my art to service my people — to reflect us, to relate to us, to stimulate us, to make us aware of our potential.”

The singer, or singing head is a theme Catlett returned to over the course of her long career.  Elizabeth Catlett ranks among America’s most respected sculptors.  A related work in marble is in the collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Elizabeth Catlett, El Canto 1968, bronze

El Canto 1968, bronze


New works by Donald Forsythe

February 8th, 2015

Donald kindly provided the following statement about this excellent new series of unique prints:

These recent prints are the result of experimentation carried out over the last two years with processes that have been dubbed low tech methods. The layers have been printed from found plywood, re-purposed Plexiglas plates, and wood reliefs drawn with shop tools like the Dremmel engraver, ball grinders, and the plunge router. I became particularly interested in reflective mylar collographs layered to resemble open bitten etching plates, and enjoy the painterly effects rendered from tarlatan wiping and the transparency of the printed surface.

Beyond these processes, I think of these works as a kind of cumulative interior architecture.  To me they suggest memory, travel, and the passage of time; fragility, brokenness, and the will to order things—to make meaning out of experience.

We are happy to show you the rest of the group.  Call to visit 215-732-7787 or email for images.

Interior/Exterior; Interior #1; Interior #4

Interior/Exterior; Interior #1; Interior #4



John Wilson, 1922-2015

January 27th, 2015

Sculptor, painter and print maker John Wilson passed away on January 26.  Wilson made his life in Boston, graduating from graduating the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston with highest honors  in 1945 and received a bachelor’s degree in education from Tufts University in 1947.  With a traveling on fellowship from the School of the MFA, Boston, Wilson studied with Ferdinand Leger in Paris.  In 1950, a John Hay Whitney Fellowship took him to Mexico where he pursued his interest in  mural making.  His 1986 bronze bust of Martin Luther King stands in the Capitol Rotunda in Washington, DC.  The Boston Globe quotes his wife, Julie: “Essentially, he felt that his main objective as an artist was to deliver a message to people about black dignity, about racial justice, about poor people trying to get a better deal in life.”

We are honored to share 2 important lithographs, Dialogue, 1955 and Urbanites, 1964 by the excellent John Wilson

John Wilson Dialogue 1955, lithograph

Dialogue 1955, lithograph

John WIlson Urbanites 1964, lithograph

Urbanites 1964, lithograph