Additional Material

 

Red Music by Michael Canning

May 8th, 2014
Michael Canning, Red Music, 2014, ink, acrylic, soot, charcoal, graphite & collage, 48 x 36"

Red Music, 2014

We are very pleased to share an image of Red Music, Michael Canning’s new drawing that incorporates charcoal, soot, ink, acrylic paint, graphite & collage elements.  The scale is grand at 48 x 36″ and Michael matches the fragile and yet defiant beauty of this flowering plant with his rugged, almost brutal treatment of the paper and chosen materials.

 

A rare bronze by Richmond Barthé (American, 1901-1989)

February 27th, 2014

Head of a Dancer is an elegant portrait of Czech-born dancer Harald Kreutzberg. Kreutzberg was active on the stage and German cinema. Kreutzberg befriended Richmond Barthé when he performed in the United States in the 1930s. Barthé was working in Harlem and the performing arts were a constant interest and theme in his work.  Barthé studied Martha Graham dance techniques to better understand movement and the human form. We have found other examples of Head of a Dancer in the public collections at the Driskell Center, University of Maryland, the Amistad Research Center at Tulane University, the Scad Museum of Art in Savanah, GA, and in two private collections. Ours is the only example with the rich, green patina visible here.

Richmond Barthé Head of a Dancer, bronze

Richmond Barthé Head of a Dancer, bronze

Drawings by Mark Goodwin @ INK

December 2nd, 2013

Mark Goodwin writes of his work,”I am the maker. In fact I am in many ways a very skilled maker, but my work is often about ignoring those skills. When trying to lose control of your skills to let things happen otherwise, it is a push pull, going back and forth between in control and not being in control. Taking crude material and transforming it into something where it becomes something more than what it was.”

Goodwin brings tremendous skill to his works on paper which are often heavily worked — the paper is creased from behind to form patterns, from the other side ridges hold paint that is then abraded and perhaps repainted. Mark Goodwin maps out a pattern or system that sets up a way to understand what happens in his work. But the system willfully turns on itself and we are required to slow down for some further looking and only then we become aware of other layers of simultaneous information. Like a well crafted story the work is only fully comprehended after all meanings are given full consideration. Like the reader, the viewer is rewarded for a careful read of Mark Goodwin.

Mark Goodwin Viewing Room, milk paint & collage

Mark Goodwin Viewing Room, milk paint & collage, 30 x 22″

New Sarah Lutz monoprints @ INK

December 1st, 2013

Sarah Lutz’s new abstract monoprints layer fields of bright strong color with cellular and flower imagery to create a sense of weightlessness. Elements appear to float in a color based environment while scale changes imply deep or infinite space.
Sarah has exhibited nationally and most recently at the Painting Center in New York. Lutz was also recently awarded a residency at MAPspace in Port Chester, NY where she developed a collaborative installation.

Sarah Lutz Hanging Garden Series V, monoprint

Sarah Lutz Hanging Garden Series V, monoprint

Recent works on paper by Rachel Selekman

November 27th, 2013

Rachel Selekman’s works on paper entice the viewer with unusual if everyday materials, compelling imagery and process-rich construction. Metallic threads burst out of brass watering can roses and swirls of charcoal accentuated with glass beads mimic the flow of water. Hands are outstretched and crotches sprout roots. The majority of the works on paper are built incrementally, often using delicate vintage materials. Hand-sewing is a dominant mode of construction, though many works are also collaged.

The most recent works on paper, those from the Fifty series, which were started just prior to turning fifty and are still ongoing, are about time passing, one phase ending and another beginning, sadness and loss versus hope and expectation. But they are also an opportunity to explore the themes and imagery that have interested me for years as well as branch out in new directions, laying the groundwork for future larger-scale works on paper.
We will show a selection of Rachel’s works on paper at INK Art Fair 2013.

Rachel Selekman Fifty (15), gold ink & graphite

Rachel Selekman Fifty (15), gold ink & graphite

Large scale abstract woodcuts by Christopher Hartshorne

November 26th, 2013

Christopher Hartshorne makes unique large scale abstract woodcuts from multiple blocks. Amze Emmons put it well: “Creating work that has the feeling of intuitive, gestural abstraction, Hartshorne successfully stakes out some new territory in the now crowded field of monochromatic relief printing.”
“Working on very large rolls of paper with asymetrical compositions, the work has the presence of immense Asian scrolls in form, but the imagery is much more ephemeral, emphasizing process and making direct if abstract references to natural forms. The use of stencils, repeat printing blocks and idiosyncratic compositional breaks also seem to vaguely reference Rosenquist’s large canvases of cross-cut content. This is strong and inspiring work that seems unconcerned with current trends.” (Printeresting, September 5, 2011)
“The bold shift from his previous work is the introduction of color, which Hartshorne approaches with a disconcerting lack of caution. The prints are intensely beautiful but also optically intense. In an moment where sophisticated color relationships are a readily available commodity to purposely push color relationships into a corner where they start to become dangerous is a bold decision. The introduction of color adds a myriad of new levels of possibility to Hartshorne’s work. The visible signatures of process in Hartshorne’s work speak of an complicated relationship between careful planning and intuitive response.”  (Printeresting, May 5, 2013)
Dolan/Maxwell will have a selection of Christopher’s prints at INK art fair 2013, Miami Beach.

Christopher Hartshorne Lattice Energy 2013

Christopher Hartshorne Lattice Energy 2013

Important works by Beauford Delaney noted

September 19th, 2013

We were recently contacted by Paris-based blog, Les Amis de Beauford Delaney asking about our holdings of works by Delaney (1901-1979). We have two superb examples: a 1946 pastel from his New York period and a 1962 canvas from Delaney’s celebrated Yellow series which was made in Paris.
Beauford Delaney exhibited at Philadelphia’s Pyramid Club in 1947. There he met Dox Thrash, an active member of the club who served on the exhibtions committee. To read more of our Delaney’s, click on the link to Les Amis.

http://lesamisdebeauforddelaney.blogspot.com/2013/09/where-to-find-beaufords-art.html

Beauford Delaney, Untitled (grape motif), pastel

Beauford Delaney, Untitled (grape motif), pastel

Philadelphia’s WPA print workshop: Raymond Steth

September 4th, 2013

Raymond Steth, born 1917, Norfolk, Virginia; died 1997, Philadelphia, began working in the graphics division of the WPA/FAP in Philadelphia in 1938. Here he worked with Dox Thrash, inventor of the Carborundum mezzotint. In addition to Thrash’s new technique, Steth produced a fine group of lithographs with Social Realist themes that document his intimate knowledge of city life as well as the rural South. Wrapping Tobacco is a rare example of Steth exploring Depression-era life in Virginia’s Tobacco fields. Steth infuses his prints with a profound emotional that places them amongst the very best works produced for the WPA.
Steth later studied at the Barnes Foundation, Philadelphia, the Philadelphia College of Art, where he later taught. He co-founded and directed the Philographic School of Art from 1948-1953. His remarkable prints are in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Library of Congress, the Corcoran Gallery of Art, the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Smithsonian Institution.

Wrapping Tobacco, lithograph, c. 1940

Wrapping Tobacco, lithograph, c. 1940

Werner Drewes: Atelier 17 +

July 30th, 2013

Werner Drewes (1899-1995) studied with Paul Klee, Johannes Itten and Lionel Feininger after enrolling at the Bauhaus in Weimar in 1921. After a wedding trip he returned to complete his training with László Moholy-Nagy and Wassily Kandinsky at the Bauhaus in Dessau in 1929.  He emigrated to the United States in 1930 and began teaching printmaking at the Booklyn Museum under the auspices of the WPA. He was a founder of the American Abstract Artists and lectured at Stanley William Hayter‘s Atelier 17 in New York before moving on to a teaching career at Washington University in St. Louis. In the 1940s Drewes befriended Hans Moller, a fellow German ex-patriot and respected artist. We include Moller’s portrait of Drewes here.

A retrospective devoted to Drewes’s prints was mounted by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American Art in 1984. His work is included in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, the Brooklyn Museum, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Guggenheim Museum, New York; National Gallery of Art, the Philips Collection, the Library of Congress, and National Museum of American Artists, Smithsonian, Washington, DC; Boston Museum of Fine Arts; and Art Institute of Chicago. We have a strong selection of works by Drewes and Moller.
Please let us know if you wish to have images sent, or would like to meet to see them first hand.

Annunciation 1945, engraving

Annunciation 1945, engraving

Le Coq Jaloux, 1942

Le Coq Jaloux, 1942, color woodcut

Hans Moller's 1948 portrait of Werner Drewes

Hans Moller’s 1948 portrait of Werner Drewes

Steven Ford out of Ireland

July 2nd, 2013

Steven Ford worked in the print studio of the Ballinglen Arts Foundation as an invited Fellow in late 2012. We’re including here four prints showing Steve’s reaction to the bleak Winter landscape of County Mayo, where colors pop with intensity under the watercolor-grey skies. Steve enjoyed some extremely wet weather, describing the blanket bogs as giant sponge. A worm-eaten, discarded plank became a matrix to express the water-veiled way the world looks in Ballycastle, Ireland. Another work from Ford’s time in Ireland can be seen amongst his works on the main page of our site, Untitled (N0115O). All works are linocut, collagraph & relief from the above mentioned plank with chine colle; each measures approximately 44 x 30″ are signed and dated (2013), in verso. They are available at $4500 each.

Untitled (N0115H) Untitled (N0115H)

Untitled (N0115H) on left and Untitled (N0115H) on right

Untitled (N0115J) Untitled (N0115K)

Untitled (N0115J) on left and Untitled (N0115K) on right