Additional Material

 

Watercolors by Beauford Delaney

April 26th, 2019

We are pleased to share news of an excellent selection of paintings on paper by Modern master, Beauford Delaney (1901-1979). These works date from the 1960s after Delaney became established among the expatriate community of American artists. “I left New York for Paris in 1953, and I have painted with greater freedom ever since. I tried to paint light, different kinds of light, and my painting has been associated with “abstraction.”

We share here an image of a luminous watercolor made during a visit to Athens, Greece in 1961. Delaney’s trip was supported by Darthea Speyer, the American cultural ambassador and art dealer. The trip brought on a severe bout of depression and Delaney relied heavily on his friends in Paris who helped in his recovery.

Beauford Delaney, Athens, 1961, watercolor & graphite
Athens, 1961
Darthea Speyer & Beauford Delaney
Darthea Speyer & Beauford Delaney

Rare works by Ed Clark

February 25th, 2019

We are pleased to share a small group of works by Ed Clark (born 1926, New Orleans), made in New York in the 1970s.
The oval or ellipse motif developed while Clark was working in France. “I began to feel something was wrong. Our eyes don’t see in rectangles. I was interested in an expanding image, and the best way to expand an image is the oval or ellipse. It seemed to me that the oval as a natural shape could best express movement extended beyond the limits of the canvas.” Clark’s Yucatan Series was inspired by a working trip to Mexico.

There is resurgent interest in Clark’s abstract expressionist works and long overdue since the Studio Museum in Harlem’s 1980 retrospective.
Recent and acclaimed museum exhibitions, Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power at the Tate Modern in London and the Brooklyn Museum; and the Museum of Modern Art’s The Long Run included works by Ed Clark. Major museums holding his works in permanent collections include the Art Institute of Chicago, Detroit Art Institute, Studio Museum in Harlem and the Museum of Modern Art.

Source: E. Clark and Q. Troupe, “For the Sake of the Search: An Interview with Ed Clark by Quincy Troupe,” in For the Sake of the Search, Belleville Lake, MI: Belleville Lake Press, 1997

Ed Clark, Yucatan Series 1977

Open Mind by Terry Haass

October 22nd, 2018

Open Mind 1948 is an exciting work by Terry Haass, a Czech artist (1923-2016) who emigrated to Paris from Czechoslovakia after the Nazis invaded in 1938.   After the German invasion of France in 1940, Haass and her family fled Europe and settled in New York City.  There she studied at the Art Student’s League with Will Barnett and Harry Sternberg and later became an associate of Stanley William Hayter at Atelier 17. She later managed the renowned workshop in New York City for a brief time in 1951.

Open Mind shows Haass pushing the possibilities of what printmaking and a copper plate might achieve.  Carefully engraved lines establish the structure to this exciting work and gauffrage, or carving out of the plate with a tool called a scorper make the deeply embossed white elements. Haas goes further by soldering a length of wire to the plate and thereby creating another type of line and a sculptural depth to her rich, dimensional works.  Terry Haass’s work is discussed in the new book on the Women of Atelier 17 by Christian Weyl.

 

Rare experimental works by Joan Miró

October 21st, 2018

We are delighted to share a splendid selection of rare works made by Miró in 1947 at Atelier 17 in New York City.  Miró was visiting the USA to oversee the installation of a large, spectacular mural for a restaurant in The Terrace Plaza Hotel in Cincinnati, Ohio.  The mural is now on permanent display at the Cincinnati Art Museum.

While in New York, Miró made his way to Atelier 17 where he joined a group of artists investigating a method for printing the fluid handwriting evident in the works of Romantic artist and poet, William Blake (British 1857-1827).  Stanley William Hayter borrowed a fragment of one of Blake’s copper plates from the collection of Lessing Rosenwald.  Four methods of inking the plate were attempted and Miró made a group of plates to print as well.  We have pairs of impressions showing relief and intaglio versions from the same plates and a few with color counter-proofs as the group work to discover Blake’s lost technique. Fred Becker and Gabor Peterdi assisted Hayter and Miró as they worked to decipher Blake’s mystery and in the meanwhile advanced their own methods at this important moment in 20th Century print making history.  Each work in the group is dated and annotated “New York”, and “pour Hayter”.  Examples of the test prints from the Blake plate were preserved as well.  All have remained in Hayter’s collection these 70 years and we are proud to offer them.

L’Antitete pair B-I

 

L’Antitete pair D-J

I Have a Dream by Charles White

October 20th, 2018

We are pleased to share an important, late lithograph by Charles White (American, 1918-1979).  I Have A Dream 1976, shows the masterful draftsmanship for which White is celebrated.  This elegant work shows us a sleeping child cradled by serene, upward looking woman.  The title references the iconic speech given by Reverend Martin Luther King Jr on the occasion of the 1963 March on Washington calling for an end to racism and for civil and economic rights for all. This important work was commissioned by the Graphic Arts Council of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

The acclaimed exhibition, Charles White: A Retrospective is on view at New York’s Museum of Modern Art thru January 13 2019.

Charles White, American 1918-1979
I Have a Dream , 1976 lithograph, edition 125, image/sheet  22 x 30" 
signed, titled & dated in recto

Claire Falkenstein’s Struttura Grafica c. 1953

April 11th, 2018

Claire Falkenstein (American, 1908-1997) initially met Stanley William Hayter when he visited the California College of Arts and Crafts in 1935.  They renewed their acquaintance when she lived in Paris and worked at the re-established Atelier 17 in the early 1950s.   

Falkenstein brought an independent approach to the Hayter’s experimental workshop, dispensing with convention of merely engraving or etching an image into the plate.  Instead she cut and soldered scrap metal shapes to build relief matrices, bringing her own sense of structure and form to the print making process.  The metal constructions were then daubed with ink and sent them through the press with sheets of dampened hand-made linen paper.  The sheets are heavily embossed, creating a bas relief that goes so far as to puncture the sheet.  These collagraphs are called Struttura Grafica and are signed, dated and annotated épreuve d’artiste.  They come to us from Hayter’s own collection.  We are indebted to David Acton’s book, The Stamp of Impulse: Abstract Expressionist Prints for insight and explanation of these rare and important works.

Claire Falkenstein Struttura Grafica 1953 collagraph

Struttura Grafica 1953

 

Claire Falkenstein Struttura Grafica 1953 collagraph

Struttura Grafica 1953

 

 

 

 

 

An early monotype by Pierre Alechinsky

October 26th, 2017

After Atelier 17 became re-established in Paris in 1950, younger artists made their way to work there.  Among them was Belgian artist, Pierre Alechinsky (born 1927) who began living and working in Paris in 1951.  That same year Alechinsky organized the final CoBraA exhibition in Liegée Belgium.

The personal quality of hand-writing greatly appealed to CoBrA artists. ‘The important thing,’ Alechinsky wrote, ‘is to discover an inner script … with which we can explore ourselves organically.’ Alechinsky said that he painted as if he was a spinning-top, unable to control his own movements. This is evident in The Night (Le Nuit) in which twists and twirls of white on a black ground evoke luminous night forms. *Tate Gallery label, July 2008

Alechinsky’s approach would seem to grow out of Hayter’s interest in automatic drawing or engraving as a kind of automatism.   We have on offer a color trial proof, Le Nuit which was printed from a plate made at Atelier 17 in Paris in 1952 and annotated, monotype.  It was later published in 1968 as part of Alechinsky’s folio, Hayterophilies.  Our impression expresses a tenderness with soft-toned blue and yellow set against the activity and energy of the gestures

Pierre Alechinsky Le Nuit 1952 aquatint with color relief roll

Pierre Alechinsky Le Nuit 1952

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Stanley William Hayter’s plaster prints from Atelier 17

October 25th, 2017

Hayter’s fascination with the relief character of the printed burin line led him and other members of Atelier 17 to explore printing techniques that emphasized the sculptural nature of the engraved plate.  As early as 1931, experiments were made at Atelier 17 with “plaster prints,” or actual plaster casts of engraved copper plates.  Hayter learned about this technique of making a print in plaster of Paris from a Treatise on Etching by Maxine Francçois Antoine Lalanne
This technique had the advantage of demonstrating the relief of the lines more clearly than the lines of an inked print on paper.  The print (on paper) reveals more of the subtleties of engraving such as fine lines and tonal relationships, but the plaster cast emphasized the depth of the engraved lines.  * Thanks to Joanne Moser, Atelier 17 A 50th Anniversary Retrospective Exhibition, Elvehjem Art Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison 1977

We are proud to offer Hayter’s Myth of Creation 1940 (BM134), along with a state-proof impression from the same plate.  Plaster prints are hybrid works that both print making and sculpture.  Other examples can be found in major museum collections and it is a rare opportunity when a superb example like Myth of Creation comes becomes available for sale.

Stanley William Hayter Myth of Creation 1941

Hayter Myth of Creation 1941, carved plaster print

Hayter Myth of Creation 1941 State I 1940 engraving, proof, 1st state

Hayter Myth of Creation 1941 State I 1940 engraving, proof, 1st state

Rare early engravings by Louise Bourgeois

October 25th, 2017

We are proud to offer some early engravings by Louise Bourgeois (French-American, 1911-2010).

In 1946 Bourgeois finally found her way to Atelier 17, the intaglio workshop that Stanley William Hayter had moved from Paris to New York in 1940. The expertise of Hayter and the array of international artists who worked there made the Atelier a center of printmaking activity in the city. When asked about the Atelier Bourgeois noted the social setting, she stated, “There were a lot of interesting people there…” The Chilean artist Nemecio Antunez, who spoke French became a good friend, and she developed a close relationship with Joan Miró when he was at the workshop in 1947. Bourgeois undertook there her most important print project of the forties: the book/portfolio He Disappeared into Complete Silence.  *Thanks to Deborah Wye, from The Prints of Louise Bourgeois.

From this period with 1949 we have Hanging Weeds Wye #56. Ours is a strong, elegant proof after the third state. We also have a proof impression of Plate 3 from the folio, He Disappeared into Complete Silence 1947.  These rare works came to us from Hayter’s own print collection, as did Nemecio Antunez’s City Dwellers 1950.  Mr Antunez (Chilean, 1918–1993) later became a major figure in Chilean art.

Louise Bourgeois Hanging Weeds 1949 engraving, state proof

Louise Bourgeois Hanging Weeds 1949

Nemecio Antunez City Dwellers 1950 etching with surface roll applied color

Nemecio Antunez City Dwellers 1950

New etchings by John Walker

October 24th, 2017

We are pleased to present a new prints project by the distinguished Contemporary painter, John Walker (born 1939, Birmingham, England) .  They are titled Fenway I, II, III, IV and the group was produced while Walker was a visiting artist at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design.

Born in Birmingham, England, John Walker was awarded the Harkness and Guggenheim Fellowships. He was awarded artist-in-residence at Oxford University and Monash University, Australia. In 1972 he represented England at the Venice Biennale. He has taught at the Royal College of London, Yale University, and Boston University, and his work is included in the permanent collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Guggenheim Museum, Whitney Museum, MOMA, MFA Boston, Cleveland Museum, Tate Gallery, British Museum

Fenway II is a sugar lift aquatint with hand coloring.   The rough-hewn patterns and soft-edged colors are draw upon memory and observation of the New England landscape and seascape.  These robust works are the latest in Walker’s long and distinguished career.

John Walker, Fenway II 2017 sugarlift etching with hand coloring, image/sheet  30 x 22"

John Walker, Fenway II 2017