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Archive for the ‘Atelier 17’ Category

Krishna Reddy’s color viscosity intaligo prints

August 1st, 2017

We have a great selection of early and innovative prints selected from Krishna Reddy’s studio.  We are happy to send images and information.  Please contact us: info@dolanmaxwell.com

“I first met Krishna in the early fifties.  He was studying sculpture with Ossip Zakine in Paris.  Zadkine sent Krishna to me because he felt that this young Indian artist also possessed remarkable graphic talents that the atmosphere of the Atelier 17 might allow to develop fully.  Thus it was the sculptural aspect of printmaking that he commenced to develop: not as many other sculptors the repetition of the sculptural drawing nor the representation of sculptures realized or to be realized, but rather the plate as a sculpture in itself and its amplification by means of print.  Thus, whereas a sculptor can erect a framework in space, an object having the relations between internal and external space, in a print made from a sculptured surface it is entirely possible to invert the space of the structure and to exchange the internal with the external space.  This characteristic ambiguity, not in the sense of confusion, but rather in the sense of multiple linked expressions he elaborated not only in black and white but in a very curious and original use of the function of color as space. Others have used the simple consequences of color opposition to demonstrate space as cold color against warm color, tone against a complementary.  Krishna however employed extremely subtle variants of color carried the hollows of a plate going far beyond simple sculptural relief giving as a result a complex web in which light itself becomes the medium of sculpture”.

Stanley William Hayter
Introduction, Krishna Reddy: A Retrospective
Bronx Museum, 1982

Krishna Reddy, Butterfly, 1952 color trial proof

Butterfly, 1952 color trial proof

Rare Modernist intaglio works by Helen Phillips

October 20th, 2015

American sculptor and print maker Helen Phillips born 1913, Fresno, California.  She studied at the School of Fine Art in San Francisco and learned direct carving techniques from Ralph Stackpole, who introduced her to Diego Rivera but Phillips was more excited by Oceanic and Pre-Columbian art than Social Realism.    Phillips won Phelan Traveling Fellowship which allowed her to work in Paris in 1936.   There, she entered Atelier 17, the intaglio print workshop where she met it’s founder and future husband, Stanley William Hayter. Learning to engrave copper in Paris had an important impact on the development of her sculpture, forcing her to become conscious of negative space.  She fled to New York in 1939 and became a pioneer of the New York School, exhibiting with Wilfredo Lam, Roberto Matta, David Hare, Isamu Noguchi and Arshile Gorky.
Phillips’s sculpture and intaglio prints are in the permanent collections of the Albright Knox Gallery,  Peggy Guggenheim, Venice,  Dallas Museum of Art, Smithsonian American Art Museum, San Diego Museum of Art. San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, MOMA, New York, DeYoung Museum, San Francisco, Princeton University Art Museum and the Victoria and Albert Museum, London.  She died in New York in 1995.

Helen Phillips, Danseuses, c. 1959 and Saltimbanques, 1954

Danseuses, c. 1959 and Saltimbanques, 1954

Atelier 17 in New York, meet and marry

June 25th, 2015

We enjoyed a recent visit with artist Ellen (Abbey) Countey.  Ellen was born in Brooklyn, NY in 1923 and studied with William Zorach at the Art Students League. She is the model for Zorach’s 1942 marble bust, Quest, now at the Wichita Art Museum.  Ellen made the complex and beautiful engraving, Scattered Journey, in 1946 in New York at Atelier 17.  It came to us from Stanley William Hayter’s private collection of works by friends and artists who worked at Atelier 17, which is where Ellen met her husband, Edward Countey.  The Counteys remained in contact with Hayter and Ellen made more engravings at Atelier 17 in Paris in June of 1986.  It was there she met Margo Dolan and Peter Maxwell while they were visiting Hayter’s studio.  A few months later Ellen wrote asking about our Joseph Hecht (1891-1951) catalog.  Hecht introduced Hayter to engraving and they remained close throughout Hecht’s life.

Edward Countey (1921-1984), studied with Moses Soyer at the New School of Art in New York from 1938-42.   He served in the US Army Signal Photographic Corps in New Guinea in 1942-45.  Countey received a 3 year fellowship to study with Stanley William Hayter at Atelier 17 in New York shortly after his return.  He assisted Hayter and Jess Paley in producing the educational film, “New Ways of Gravure” and he drew the animated film, “Attack”, for the Signal Corp.  “Attack”  is part of film collection at MOMA.  Countey’s engravings were exhibited internationally with a show organized from MOMA’s collection and had two solo exhibitions in New York.  He later taught at SUNY Stony Brook in the engineering Department and subsequently in the Department of Art.  Countey’s Paw Paw, 1949, is a large and ambitious work with engraving, etching and stenciled color.  An impression was acquired by MOMA in 1949 and it was included in MOMA’s exhibition, “Some American Prints, 1945-50”.  Our impression also belonged to  Hayter, as did Countey’s Apollo.

One of the great joys of what we do is sharing the stories that are behind the works of art.

Engravings, Scattered Journey by Ellen (Abbey) Countey and Paw Paw by Edward Countey

Scattered Journey by Ellen (Abbey) Countey and Paw Paw by Edward Countey

Letterio Calapai’s 1946 Underground

July 24th, 2014
Letterio Calapai Underground, 1946

Letterio Calapai Underground, 1946

Underground by Letterio Calapai (1902-1993) is a dynamic work that shows a keen awareness in the methods of Stanley William Hayter’s Atelier 17, incorporating a combination of engraving, soft ground and aquatint techniques.  Calapai’s vivid reaction to the crush of people commuting on the subway at 42nd Street is well matched to the rich surfaces and charged engraved lines.  The subject brings to mind the social realist works of the WPA prints of the 1930s which Calapai knew first hand from his work in the New York print shop.  It is also interesting to consider this work in the context of Benton Spruance’s 1937 series of lithographs, The People Work.  Views to multiple levels of trains and spaces bring to mind the imagined 18th Century interior Prison etchings of Giovanni Battista Piranesi.  In Calapai’s hands the space is flattened out, and a sense of folded space is created by forced angles.  We are above and below the action, seeing it all simultaneously.

 

Werner Drewes: Atelier 17 +

July 30th, 2013

Werner Drewes (1899-1995) studied with Paul Klee, Johannes Itten and Lionel Feininger after enrolling at the Bauhaus in Weimar in 1921. After a wedding trip he returned to complete his training with László Moholy-Nagy and Wassily Kandinsky at the Bauhaus in Dessau in 1929.  He emigrated to the United States in 1930 and began teaching printmaking at the Booklyn Museum under the auspices of the WPA. He was a founder of the American Abstract Artists and lectured at Stanley William Hayter‘s Atelier 17 in New York before moving on to a teaching career at Washington University in St. Louis. In the 1940s Drewes befriended Hans Moller, a fellow German ex-patriot and respected artist. We include Moller’s portrait of Drewes here.

A retrospective devoted to Drewes’s prints was mounted by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American Art in 1984. His work is included in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, the Brooklyn Museum, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Guggenheim Museum, New York; National Gallery of Art, the Philips Collection, the Library of Congress, and National Museum of American Artists, Smithsonian, Washington, DC; Boston Museum of Fine Arts; and Art Institute of Chicago. We have a strong selection of works by Drewes and Moller.
Please let us know if you wish to have images sent, or would like to meet to see them first hand.

Annunciation 1945, engraving

Annunciation 1945, engraving

Le Coq Jaloux, 1942

Le Coq Jaloux, 1942, color woodcut

Hans Moller's 1948 portrait of Werner Drewes

Hans Moller’s 1948 portrait of Werner Drewes

Collections

November 16th, 2012

Additional Contemporary and Modern artists as well as our collections of African American, Atelier 17, and WPA artists will be featured on this page.