Additional Material

 

A pair of rare works by Spanish Master Joan Miró

October 23rd, 2017

We are delighted to share a pair of proof impressions of Serie I from plates made by Joan Miró at Atelier 17 in New York in 1947.  Miró had come to the United States for work on a commission for the Plaza Hotel in Cincinnati, Ohio.   He had been working at Atelier 17 on and off since the early 1930s and visited Stanley William Hayter in New York in June, 1947.

“One of the artists who exploited the effects of open bite etching most successfully was Joan Miró. Previously Miró had limited his prints to fairly conventional etchings and drypoints”.  However, in New York in 1947, “the variety and unorthodoxy of the devices Miró employed…testify not only to the imaginative powers of an individual artist, but also to the uninhibited attitude toward experimentation that prevailed at Atelier 17 during the 1940s.  (Joanne Moser’s, Atelier 17 A 50th Anniversary Retrospective Exhibition, Elvehjem Art Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison 1977)

The plate for Mirós Serie I (Dupin 75-82) was printed and published by Maeght in Paris in 1952.  However our impressions were pulled when Miró made the plate in New York.  They are a superb demonstration of Miró exploring the possibilities of an etched plate:  one impression is printed in relief, with the ink rolled onto the surface where with the other impression he has inked and wiped the surface of the plate clean to push the figures forward, haloed by the deep-etched outline. They are a handsome pair and both are annotated, “pour Hayter New York 17/6/1947”.  The relief impression is also annotated on back, “Femme Enfants Etoilé,” while the intaglio impression is annotated, “Jeux d’Enfant”.

We are fortunate that this pair remained together in Hayter’s own collection and we could not be more pleased to offer them 70 years on.

Joan Miró, Serie I, 1947 printed relief

Joan Miró, Serie I, 1947 printed relief

Joan Miró, Serie I, 1947 open bite etching, printed intaglio

Joan Miró, Serie I, 1947 printed intaglio

A new lithograph and drawings by Victoria Burge

October 20th, 2017

Victoria Burge makes prints and drawings that use systems of mapping to generate abstracted cartographies of imagined terrains.  We are very pleased to present her newest large-scaled, six-color lithograph with lots of hand work, Vega, 2017.  We will show this extraordinary new work at the 2017 IFPDA Print Fair.  Please ask to see it along with an earlier lithograph of the night sky and 2 new and related drawings.

Victoria Burge’s prints are in the permanent collections of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the British Museum, the Hunterian Museum and the Philadelphia Museum of Art.  She has been awarded Fellowships and grants in support of her work from the Independence Foundation, the Krasner-Pollock Foundation and will travel to Ireland in 2018 for a residency at the Ballinglen Arts Foundation.

Victoria Burge Vega 2017 six-color lithograph with hand coloring, edition 10

Victoria Burge’s Vega 2017

Krishna Reddy’s color viscosity intaligo prints

August 1st, 2017

We have a great selection of early and innovative prints selected from Krishna Reddy’s studio.  We are happy to send images and information.  Please contact us: info@dolanmaxwell.com

“I first met Krishna in the early fifties.  He was studying sculpture with Ossip Zakine in Paris.  Zadkine sent Krishna to me because he felt that this young Indian artist also possessed remarkable graphic talents that the atmosphere of the Atelier 17 might allow to develop fully.  Thus it was the sculptural aspect of printmaking that he commenced to develop: not as many other sculptors the repetition of the sculptural drawing nor the representation of sculptures realized or to be realized, but rather the plate as a sculpture in itself and its amplification by means of print.  Thus, whereas a sculptor can erect a framework in space, an object having the relations between internal and external space, in a print made from a sculptured surface it is entirely possible to invert the space of the structure and to exchange the internal with the external space.  This characteristic ambiguity, not in the sense of confusion, but rather in the sense of multiple linked expressions he elaborated not only in black and white but in a very curious and original use of the function of color as space. Others have used the simple consequences of color opposition to demonstrate space as cold color against warm color, tone against a complementary.  Krishna however employed extremely subtle variants of color carried the hollows of a plate going far beyond simple sculptural relief giving as a result a complex web in which light itself becomes the medium of sculpture”.

Stanley William Hayter
Introduction, Krishna Reddy: A Retrospective
Bronx Museum, 1982

Krishna Reddy, Butterfly, 1952 color trial proof

Butterfly, 1952 color trial proof

An important painting on paper by Norman Lewis

February 28th, 2017

Born in Harlem and working within New York City’s downtown art scene, Norman Wilfred Lewis (1909-1979) first began painting in a figural style grounded in social realism, focusing on bread lines, police brutality, and the struggles of black Americans. Lewis transitioned to a more abstract style of art during the 1940s and 1950s, continuing to focus on social inequalities but growing increasingly interested in personal expression rather than representation. Lewis’s shift to abstraction was driven in part by his realization that reproducing or mirroring social conditions did not adequately reflect his goals as an artist. At the same time the subjects of race and civil rights reclaimed Lewis’s work in a profound way in the 1960s.  Works like Untitled 1961 address political activism and humanitarian concerns through hazy visuals inspired by clandestine Ku Klux Klan gatherings and political marches and Labor Day parades.

The Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art organized Procession, a major retrospective of Lewis’s works in 2016, which traveled to the Amon Carter Museum and the Chicago Cultural Center.  Curator and author Ruth Fine received a 2017 award of distinction from the College Art Association for the Norman Lewis exhibition catalogue.

UNTITLED 1961, oil on paper, signed and dated in recto

UNTITLED 1961, oil on paper, 19 x 26″

New etchings by Stan Whitney

January 7th, 2017

We are pleased to offer an important new group of eight etchings by Stanley Whitney (born 1946, Philadelphia, PA).  Whitney is a 2016 USA Jeanne & Michael Klein Fellow.  His 2015 exhibition at the Studio Museum in Harlem brought a new level of critical and market notice.  This brand new series of large etchings show Whitney continuing his exploration of abstract motifs—the layering and stacking of grid and gesture, line and shape.  Whitney was a Guggenheim Fellow in 1996.

Stan Whitney 8 Untitled etchings 2016, edition 18

From top left, numbers 1-8
edition 18, each image 19 1/2 x 24 3/8″ each sheet 29 1/8 x 32 1/2″

 

Anders Bergstom

October 31st, 2016

Anders Bergstrom’s  Brown Bag Test is emblematic of everyday commerce and discrimination. Each series of bags is unique.  The Metropolitan Museum of Art acquired a set, Brown Bag Test, December 21, 2014, Proof and Counterproof, and it is handsomely installed in the rotating prints gallery #690.  From their label, “The brown paper bag is both a quotidian and a designed object.  Bergstrom creates miniature replicas with details such as jagged edges, seams, and inked numbers that are imitative of a bar code but which actually corresponds to the artist’s zip code.  This work’s title references the discriminatory practice in which an individual’s complexion is judged against the color of a brown paper bag, yet Bergstrom does not privilege one bag over another, instead arranging them on a spectrum from light to dark.”

Anders has explored the everyday paper bag in it’s multiple states of use–replicating the grease-stained and the crumpled.   Anders’s printed works are included in the permanent collections at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Yale’s Beinecke Library, Smith College Museum of Art and the New York Public Library.  The Met’s  Brown Bag Test, December 21, 2014, is on view thru early January 2017.

Brown Bag Test August 02, 2016

Brown Bag Test August 02, 2016

Brown Bag Test December 21, 2014, Proof and Counterproof installed @ the Met

Brown Bag Test December 21, 2014 installed @ the Met

A large scale, unique woodcut by Matthew Colaizzo

September 17th, 2016

We are pleased to share a dramatic new work by this Philadelphia native.  Colaizzo’s work focuses on landscapes that blur the line between natural and unnatural. It contextualizes man’s mark on the earth with a broad view of nature. It involves ideas about natural history, cosmos, human progress, mystery, and spirit.

This large (36 x 96″), work was made by using multi-block woodcuts printed by hand to create landscapes that are inspired by the coal industry’s mark in Northeastern Pennsylvania. The scarred earth and mountains of coal are evidence of “human progress,” symbolizing man’s relationship with the earth, trying to seize and conquer it for our own benefit rather than relish in its mysteries.  With A Place on Earth, Matt takes inspiration from a contemporary landworks project– a highway rebuilding site that is both immediate and seemingly far removed from a densely populated city.

 

Matthew Colaizzo, A Place on Earth, 2015, unique woodcut

A Place on Earth, 2015

Alfred Bendiner’s Philadelphia

July 28th, 2016

Alfred Bendiner’s “And So I Give You Our Candidate and the Next President of the United States of America” 1948 captures the energy of convention week then and now in Philadelphia. Bendiner was trained as an architect but is better known as a celebrated cartoonist for the Philadelphia Bulletin known for his wry humor and social commentary. One can only imagine what he’d make of our 2016 presidential race.

This work was made in 1948 when both the Democratic Party Convention and the G.O.P. Convention were both held in Philadelphia.  We believe the wreathed candidate is Thomas Dewey, who famously lost to Harry Truman and became one of our most admired presidents.

We have an excellent selection of works by Bendiner (1899-1964).  Please ask for more images or, even better, come visit to see them face to face.

And So I Give You Our Candidate, 1948

And So I Give You Our Candidate, 1948

New works on paper by Nona Hershey

March 1st, 2016

Nona Hershey continues to explore cloud imagery.  Her newest drawings juxtapose the ephemeral nature of clouds with flat color in highly formal patterns.  Bending and weaving grids of bright color act in opposition to the soft gray atmospheric tones and bring to mind abstracted farmed fields.  Nona’s choice of spectral colors suggest the phenomenon of rainbows. Weather patterns and wave lengths have appeared in earlier works and linger within these new drawings to evoke land and sky in a fresh and surprising way.

 

Nona Hershey Unsettled 2015 graphite powdery & gouache

Unsettled 2015

watercolor paintings & lithographs by Robert Riggs

February 16th, 2016

We are pleased to offer an excellent selection of watercolors and lithographs by Robert Riggs (1896-1970).  Riggs was one of the greatest artist-illustrators when publishing supported illustrators on a large scale.  Riggs’ success enabled him to travel around the world in the mid-1920s and included a stop in Algeria where he made our group of watercolor paintings.  Upon returned to Philadelphia he immersed himself in making lithographs, part of what he considered “dry medium”.  He began working with printer Theodore Cuno but soon decided he required a more experimental collaborator and found his way to George Miller in New York.  Riggs’ lithographs are held by museum collections throughout the USA and in England.  His subjects were the circus—he attended every performance when Barnum & Baileys set up their show in Philadelphia and befriended the performers.  Boxing was his other great passion.  Riggs produced images that put the viewer up close to the action if not in the ring.

Clown Acrobats, On the Ropes, Club Fighter & Bou Saada, Algeria lithographs and a watercolor by Robert Riggs

Clown Acrobats, On the Ropes, Club Fighter & Bou Saada, Algeria