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Posts Tagged ‘Africa’

An important painting on paper by Norman Lewis

February 28th, 2017

Born in Harlem and working within New York City’s downtown art scene, Norman Wilfred Lewis (1909-1979) first began painting in a figural style grounded in social realism, focusing on bread lines, police brutality, and the struggles of black Americans. Lewis transitioned to a more abstract style of art during the 1940s and 1950s, continuing to focus on social inequalities but growing increasingly interested in personal expression rather than representation. Lewis’s shift to abstraction was driven in part by his realization that reproducing or mirroring social conditions did not adequately reflect his goals as an artist. At the same time the subjects of race and civil rights reclaimed Lewis’s work in a profound way in the 1960s.  Works like Untitled 1961 address political activism and humanitarian concerns through hazy visuals inspired by clandestine Ku Klux Klan gatherings and political marches and Labor Day parades.

The Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art organized Procession, a major retrospective of Lewis’s works in 2016, which traveled to the Amon Carter Museum and the Chicago Cultural Center.  Curator and author Ruth Fine received a 2017 award of distinction from the College Art Association for the Norman Lewis exhibition catalogue.

UNTITLED 1961, oil on paper, signed and dated in recto

UNTITLED 1961, oil on paper, 19 x 26″

New etchings by Stan Whitney

January 7th, 2017

We are pleased to offer an important new group of eight etchings by Stanley Whitney (born 1946, Philadelphia, PA).  Whitney is a 2016 USA Jeanne & Michael Klein Fellow.  His 2015 exhibition at the Studio Museum in Harlem brought a new level of critical and market notice.  This brand new series of large etchings show Whitney continuing his exploration of abstract motifs—the layering and stacking of grid and gesture, line and shape.  Whitney was a Guggenheim Fellow in 1996.

Stan Whitney 8 Untitled etchings 2016, edition 18

From top left, numbers 1-8
edition 18, each image 19 1/2 x 24 3/8″ each sheet 29 1/8 x 32 1/2″

 

watercolor paintings & lithographs by Robert Riggs

February 16th, 2016

We are pleased to offer an excellent selection of watercolors and lithographs by Robert Riggs (1896-1970).  Riggs was one of the greatest artist-illustrators when publishing supported illustrators on a large scale.  Riggs’ success enabled him to travel around the world in the mid-1920s and included a stop in Algeria where he made our group of watercolor paintings.  Upon returned to Philadelphia he immersed himself in making lithographs, part of what he considered “dry medium”.  He began working with printer Theodore Cuno but soon decided he required a more experimental collaborator and found his way to George Miller in New York.  Riggs’ lithographs are held by museum collections throughout the USA and in England.  His subjects were the circus—he attended every performance when Barnum & Baileys set up their show in Philadelphia and befriended the performers.  Boxing was his other great passion.  Riggs produced images that put the viewer up close to the action if not in the ring.

Clown Acrobats, On the Ropes, Club Fighter & Bou Saada, Algeria lithographs and a watercolor by Robert Riggs

Clown Acrobats, On the Ropes, Club Fighter & Bou Saada, Algeria