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Posts Tagged ‘Atelier 17’

An early monotype by Pierre Alechinsky

October 26th, 2017

After Atelier 17 became re-established in Paris in 1950, younger artists made their way to work there.  Among them was Belgian artist, Pierre Alechinsky (born 1927) who began living and working in Paris in 1951.  That same year Alechinsky organized the final CoBraA exhibition in Liegée Belgium.

The personal quality of hand-writing greatly appealed to CoBrA artists. ‘The important thing,’ Alechinsky wrote, ‘is to discover an inner script … with which we can explore ourselves organically.’ Alechinsky said that he painted as if he was a spinning-top, unable to control his own movements. This is evident in The Night (Le Nuit) in which twists and twirls of white on a black ground evoke luminous night forms. *Tate Gallery label, July 2008

Alechinsky’s approach would seem to grow out of Hayter’s interest in automatic drawing or engraving as a kind of automatism.   We have on offer a color trial proof, Le Nuit which was printed from a plate made at Atelier 17 in Paris in 1952 and annotated, monotype.  It was later published in 1968 as part of Alechinsky’s folio, Hayterophilies.  Our impression expresses a tenderness with soft-toned blue and yellow set against the activity and energy of the gestures

Pierre Alechinsky Le Nuit 1952 aquatint with color relief roll

Pierre Alechinsky Le Nuit 1952

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Rare early engravings by Louise Bourgeois

October 25th, 2017

We are proud to offer some early engravings by Louise Bourgeois (French-American, 1911-2010).

In 1946 Bourgeois finally found her way to Atelier 17, the intaglio workshop that Stanley William Hayter had moved from Paris to New York in 1940. The expertise of Hayter and the array of international artists who worked there made the Atelier a center of printmaking activity in the city. When asked about the Atelier Bourgeois noted the social setting, she stated, “There were a lot of interesting people there…” The Chilean artist Nemecio Antunez, who spoke French became a good friend, and she developed a close relationship with Joan Miró when he was at the workshop in 1947. Bourgeois undertook there her most important print project of the forties: the book/portfolio He Disappeared into Complete Silence.  *Thanks to Deborah Wye, from The Prints of Louise Bourgeois.

From this period with 1949 we have Hanging Weeds Wye #56. Ours is a strong, elegant proof after the third state. We also have a proof impression of Plate 3 from the folio, He Disappeared into Complete Silence 1947.  These rare works came to us from Hayter’s own print collection, as did Nemecio Antunez’s City Dwellers 1950.  Mr Antunez (Chilean, 1918–1993) later became a major figure in Chilean art.

Louise Bourgeois Hanging Weeds 1949 engraving, state proof

Louise Bourgeois Hanging Weeds 1949

Nemecio Antunez City Dwellers 1950 etching with surface roll applied color

Nemecio Antunez City Dwellers 1950

A pair of rare works by Spanish Master Joan Miró

October 23rd, 2017

We are delighted to share a pair of proof impressions of Serie I from plates made by Joan Miró at Atelier 17 in New York in 1947.  Miró had come to the United States for work on a commission for the Plaza Hotel in Cincinnati, Ohio.   He had been working at Atelier 17 on and off since the early 1939s and visited Stanley William Hayter in New York in June, 1947.

“One of the artists who exploited the effects of open bite etching most successfully was Joan Miró. Previously Miró had limited his prints to fairly conventional etchings and drypoints”.  However, in New York in 1947, “the variety and unorthodoxy of the devices Miró employed…testify not only to the imaginative powers of an individual artist, but also to the uninhibited attitude toward experimentation that prevailed at Atelier 17 during the 1940s.  (Joanne Moser’s, Atelier 17 A 50th Anniversary Retrospective Exhibition, Elvehjem Art Center, university of Wisconsin, Madison 1977)

The plate for Mirós Serie I (Dupin 75-82) was printed and published by Maeght in Paris in 1952.  However our impressions were pulled when Miró made the plate in New York.  They are a superb demonstration of Miró exploring the possibilities of an etched plate:  one impression is printed in relief, with the ink rolled onto the surface where with the other impression he has inked and wiped the surface of the plate clean to push the figures forward, haloed by the deep-etched outline. They are a handsome pair and both are annotated, “pour Hayter New York 17/6/1947”.  The relief impression is also annotated on back, “Femme Enfants Etoilé,” while the intaglio impression is annotated, “Jeux d’Enfant”.

We are fortunate that this pair remained together in Hayter’s own collection and we could not be more pleased to offer them 70 years on.

Joan Miró, Serie I, 1947 printed relief

Joan Miró, Serie I, 1947 printed relief

Joan Miró, Serie I, 1947 open bite etching, printed intaglio

Joan Miró, Serie I, 1947 printed intaglio

Krishna Reddy’s color viscosity intaligo prints

August 1st, 2017

We have a great selection of early and innovative prints selected from Krishna Reddy’s studio.  We are happy to send images and information.  Please contact us: info@dolanmaxwell.com

“I first met Krishna in the early fifties.  He was studying sculpture with Ossip Zakine in Paris.  Zadkine sent Krishna to me because he felt that this young Indian artist also possessed remarkable graphic talents that the atmosphere of the Atelier 17 might allow to develop fully.  Thus it was the sculptural aspect of printmaking that he commenced to develop: not as many other sculptors the repetition of the sculptural drawing nor the representation of sculptures realized or to be realized, but rather the plate as a sculpture in itself and its amplification by means of print.  Thus, whereas a sculptor can erect a framework in space, an object having the relations between internal and external space, in a print made from a sculptured surface it is entirely possible to invert the space of the structure and to exchange the internal with the external space.  This characteristic ambiguity, not in the sense of confusion, but rather in the sense of multiple linked expressions he elaborated not only in black and white but in a very curious and original use of the function of color as space. Others have used the simple consequences of color opposition to demonstrate space as cold color against warm color, tone against a complementary.  Krishna however employed extremely subtle variants of color carried the hollows of a plate going far beyond simple sculptural relief giving as a result a complex web in which light itself becomes the medium of sculpture”.

Stanley William Hayter
Introduction, Krishna Reddy: A Retrospective
Bronx Museum, 1982

Krishna Reddy, Butterfly, 1952 color trial proof

Butterfly, 1952 color trial proof

Rare Modernist intaglio works by Helen Phillips

October 20th, 2015

American sculptor and print maker Helen Phillips born 1913, Fresno, California.  She studied at the School of Fine Art in San Francisco and learned direct carving techniques from Ralph Stackpole, who introduced her to Diego Rivera but Phillips was more excited by Oceanic and Pre-Columbian art than Social Realism.    Phillips won Phelan Traveling Fellowship which allowed her to work in Paris in 1936.   There, she entered Atelier 17, the intaglio print workshop where she met it’s founder and future husband, Stanley William Hayter. Learning to engrave copper in Paris had an important impact on the development of her sculpture, forcing her to become conscious of negative space.  She fled to New York in 1939 and became a pioneer of the New York School, exhibiting with Wilfredo Lam, Roberto Matta, David Hare, Isamu Noguchi and Arshile Gorky.
Phillips’s sculpture and intaglio prints are in the permanent collections of the Albright Knox Gallery,  Peggy Guggenheim, Venice,  Dallas Museum of Art, Smithsonian American Art Museum, San Diego Museum of Art. San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, MOMA, New York, DeYoung Museum, San Francisco, Princeton University Art Museum and the Victoria and Albert Museum, London.  She died in New York in 1995.

Helen Phillips, Danseuses, c. 1959 and Saltimbanques, 1954

Danseuses, c. 1959 and Saltimbanques, 1954

Werner Drewes: Atelier 17 +

July 30th, 2013

Werner Drewes (1899-1995) studied with Paul Klee, Johannes Itten and Lionel Feininger after enrolling at the Bauhaus in Weimar in 1921. After a wedding trip he returned to complete his training with László Moholy-Nagy and Wassily Kandinsky at the Bauhaus in Dessau in 1929.  He emigrated to the United States in 1930 and began teaching printmaking at the Booklyn Museum under the auspices of the WPA. He was a founder of the American Abstract Artists and lectured at Stanley William Hayter‘s Atelier 17 in New York before moving on to a teaching career at Washington University in St. Louis. In the 1940s Drewes befriended Hans Moller, a fellow German ex-patriot and respected artist. We include Moller’s portrait of Drewes here.

A retrospective devoted to Drewes’s prints was mounted by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American Art in 1984. His work is included in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, the Brooklyn Museum, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Guggenheim Museum, New York; National Gallery of Art, the Philips Collection, the Library of Congress, and National Museum of American Artists, Smithsonian, Washington, DC; Boston Museum of Fine Arts; and Art Institute of Chicago. We have a strong selection of works by Drewes and Moller.
Please let us know if you wish to have images sent, or would like to meet to see them first hand.

Annunciation 1945, engraving

Annunciation 1945, engraving

Le Coq Jaloux, 1942

Le Coq Jaloux, 1942, color woodcut

Hans Moller's 1948 portrait of Werner Drewes

Hans Moller’s 1948 portrait of Werner Drewes