Additional Material

Posts Tagged ‘Joan Miro’

Rare experimental works by Joan Miró

October 21st, 2018

We are delighted to share a splendid selection of rare works made by Miró in 1947 at Atelier 17 in New York City.  Miró was visiting the USA to oversee the installation of a large, spectacular mural for a restaurant in The Terrace Plaza Hotel in Cincinnati, Ohio.  The mural is now on permanent display at the Cincinnati Art Museum.

While in New York, Miró made his way to Atelier 17 where he joined a group of artists investigating a method for printing the fluid handwriting evident in the works of Romantic artist and poet, William Blake (British 1857-1827).  Stanley William Hayter borrowed a fragment of one of Blake’s copper plates from the collection of Lessing Rosenwald.  Four methods of inking the plate were attempted and Miró made a group of plates to print as well.  We have pairs of impressions showing relief and intaglio versions from the same plates and a few with color counter-proofs as the group work to discover Blake’s lost technique. Fred Becker and Gabor Peterdi assisted Hayter and Miró as they worked to decipher Blake’s mystery and in the meanwhile advanced their own methods at this important moment in 20th Century print making history.  Each work in the group is dated and annotated “New York”, and “pour Hayter”.  Examples of the test prints from the Blake plate were preserved as well.  All have remained in Hayter’s collection these 70 years and we are proud to offer them.

L’Antitete pair B-I

 

L’Antitete pair D-J

A pair of rare works by Spanish Master Joan Miró

October 23rd, 2017

We are delighted to share a pair of proof impressions of Serie I from plates made by Joan Miró at Atelier 17 in New York in 1947.  Miró had come to the United States for work on a commission for the Plaza Hotel in Cincinnati, Ohio.   He had been working at Atelier 17 on and off since the early 1930s and visited Stanley William Hayter in New York in June, 1947.

“One of the artists who exploited the effects of open bite etching most successfully was Joan Miró. Previously Miró had limited his prints to fairly conventional etchings and drypoints”.  However, in New York in 1947, “the variety and unorthodoxy of the devices Miró employed…testify not only to the imaginative powers of an individual artist, but also to the uninhibited attitude toward experimentation that prevailed at Atelier 17 during the 1940s.  (Joanne Moser’s, Atelier 17 A 50th Anniversary Retrospective Exhibition, Elvehjem Art Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison 1977)

The plate for Mirós Serie I (Dupin 75-82) was printed and published by Maeght in Paris in 1952.  However our impressions were pulled when Miró made the plate in New York.  They are a superb demonstration of Miró exploring the possibilities of an etched plate:  one impression is printed in relief, with the ink rolled onto the surface where with the other impression he has inked and wiped the surface of the plate clean to push the figures forward, haloed by the deep-etched outline. They are a handsome pair and both are annotated, “pour Hayter New York 17/6/1947”.  The relief impression is also annotated on back, “Femme Enfants Etoilé,” while the intaglio impression is annotated, “Jeux d’Enfant”.

We are fortunate that this pair remained together in Hayter’s own collection and we could not be more pleased to offer them 70 years on.

Joan Miró, Serie I, 1947 printed relief

Joan Miró, Serie I, 1947 printed relief

Joan Miró, Serie I, 1947 open bite etching, printed intaglio

Joan Miró, Serie I, 1947 printed intaglio