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Posts Tagged ‘lithograph’

A new lithograph and drawings by Victoria Burge

October 20th, 2017

Victoria Burge makes prints and drawings that use systems of mapping to generate abstracted cartographies of imagined terrains.  We are very pleased to present her newest large-scaled, six-color lithograph with lots of hand work, Vega, 2017.  We will show this extraordinary new work at the 2017 IFPDA Print Fair.  Please ask to see it along with an earlier lithograph of the night sky and 2 new and related drawings.

Victoria Burge’s prints are in the permanent collections of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the British Museum, the Hunterian Museum and the Philadelphia Museum of Art.  She has been awarded Fellowships and grants in support of her work from the Independence Foundation, the Krasner-Pollock Foundation and will travel to Ireland in 2018 for a residency at the Ballinglen Arts Foundation.

Victoria Burge Vega 2017 six-color lithograph with hand coloring, edition 10

Victoria Burge’s Vega 2017

Alfred Bendiner’s Philadelphia

July 28th, 2016

Alfred Bendiner’s “And So I Give You Our Candidate and the Next President of the United States of America” 1948 captures the energy of convention week then and now in Philadelphia. Bendiner was trained as an architect but is better known as a celebrated cartoonist for the Philadelphia Bulletin known for his wry humor and social commentary. One can only imagine what he’d make of our 2016 presidential race.

This work was made in 1948 when both the Democratic Party Convention and the G.O.P. Convention were both held in Philadelphia.  We believe the wreathed candidate is Thomas Dewey, who famously lost to Harry Truman and became one of our most admired presidents.

We have an excellent selection of works by Bendiner (1899-1964).  Please ask for more images or, even better, come visit to see them face to face.

And So I Give You Our Candidate, 1948

And So I Give You Our Candidate, 1948

watercolor paintings & lithographs by Robert Riggs

February 16th, 2016

We are pleased to offer an excellent selection of watercolors and lithographs by Robert Riggs (1896-1970).  Riggs was one of the greatest artist-illustrators when publishing supported illustrators on a large scale.  Riggs’ success enabled him to travel around the world in the mid-1920s and included a stop in Algeria where he made our group of watercolor paintings.  Upon returned to Philadelphia he immersed himself in making lithographs, part of what he considered “dry medium”.  He began working with printer Theodore Cuno but soon decided he required a more experimental collaborator and found his way to George Miller in New York.  Riggs’ lithographs are held by museum collections throughout the USA and in England.  His subjects were the circus—he attended every performance when Barnum & Baileys set up their show in Philadelphia and befriended the performers.  Boxing was his other great passion.  Riggs produced images that put the viewer up close to the action if not in the ring.

Clown Acrobats, On the Ropes, Club Fighter & Bou Saada, Algeria lithographs and a watercolor by Robert Riggs

Clown Acrobats, On the Ropes, Club Fighter & Bou Saada, Algeria

John Wilson, 1922-2015

January 27th, 2015

Sculptor, painter and print maker John Wilson passed away on January 26.  Wilson made his life in Boston, graduating from graduating the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston with highest honors  in 1945 and received a bachelor’s degree in education from Tufts University in 1947.  With a traveling on fellowship from the School of the MFA, Boston, Wilson studied with Ferdinand Leger in Paris.  In 1950, a John Hay Whitney Fellowship took him to Mexico where he pursued his interest in  mural making.  His 1986 bronze bust of Martin Luther King stands in the Capitol Rotunda in Washington, DC.  The Boston Globe quotes his wife, Julie: “Essentially, he felt that his main objective as an artist was to deliver a message to people about black dignity, about racial justice, about poor people trying to get a better deal in life.”

We are honored to share 2 important lithographs, Dialogue, 1955 and Urbanites, 1964 by the excellent John Wilson

John Wilson Dialogue 1955, lithograph

Dialogue 1955, lithograph

John WIlson Urbanites 1964, lithograph

Urbanites 1964, lithograph

 

Philadelphia’s WPA print workshop: Raymond Steth

September 4th, 2013

Raymond Steth, born 1917, Norfolk, Virginia; died 1997, Philadelphia, began working in the graphics division of the WPA/FAP in Philadelphia in 1938. Here he worked with Dox Thrash, inventor of the Carborundum mezzotint. In addition to Thrash’s new technique, Steth produced a fine group of lithographs with Social Realist themes that document his intimate knowledge of city life as well as the rural South. Wrapping Tobacco is a rare example of Steth exploring Depression-era life in Virginia’s Tobacco fields. Steth infuses his prints with a profound emotional that places them amongst the very best works produced for the WPA.
Steth later studied at the Barnes Foundation, Philadelphia, the Philadelphia College of Art, where he later taught. He co-founded and directed the Philographic School of Art from 1948-1953. His remarkable prints are in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Library of Congress, the Corcoran Gallery of Art, the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Smithsonian Institution.

Wrapping Tobacco, lithograph, c. 1940

Wrapping Tobacco, lithograph, c. 1940