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Posts Tagged ‘sculpture’

Claire Falkenstein’s Struttura Grafica c. 1953

April 11th, 2018

Claire Falkenstein (American, 1908-1997) initially met Stanley William Hayter when he visited the California College of Arts and Crafts in 1935.  They renewed their acquaintance when she lived in Paris and worked at the re-established Atelier 17 in the early 1950s.   

Falkenstein brought an independent approach to the Hayter’s experimental workshop, dispensing with convention of merely engraving or etching an image into the plate.  Instead she cut and soldered scrap metal shapes to build relief matrices, bringing her own sense of structure and form to the print making process.  The metal constructions were then daubed with ink and sent them through the press with sheets of dampened hand-made linen paper.  The sheets are heavily embossed, creating a bas relief that goes so far as to puncture the sheet.  These collagraphs are called Struttura Grafica and are signed, dated and annotated épreuve d’artiste.  They come to us from Hayter’s own collection.  We are indebted to David Acton’s book, The Stamp of Impulse: Abstract Expressionist Prints for insight and explanation of these rare and important works.

Claire Falkenstein Struttura Grafica 1953 collagraph

Struttura Grafica 1953

 

Claire Falkenstein Struttura Grafica 1953 collagraph

Struttura Grafica 1953

 

 

 

 

 

Krishna Reddy’s color viscosity intaligo prints

August 1st, 2017

We have a great selection of early and innovative prints selected from Krishna Reddy’s studio.  We are happy to send images and information.  Please contact us: info@dolanmaxwell.com

“I first met Krishna in the early fifties.  He was studying sculpture with Ossip Zakine in Paris.  Zadkine sent Krishna to me because he felt that this young Indian artist also possessed remarkable graphic talents that the atmosphere of the Atelier 17 might allow to develop fully.  Thus it was the sculptural aspect of printmaking that he commenced to develop: not as many other sculptors the repetition of the sculptural drawing nor the representation of sculptures realized or to be realized, but rather the plate as a sculpture in itself and its amplification by means of print.  Thus, whereas a sculptor can erect a framework in space, an object having the relations between internal and external space, in a print made from a sculptured surface it is entirely possible to invert the space of the structure and to exchange the internal with the external space.  This characteristic ambiguity, not in the sense of confusion, but rather in the sense of multiple linked expressions he elaborated not only in black and white but in a very curious and original use of the function of color as space. Others have used the simple consequences of color opposition to demonstrate space as cold color against warm color, tone against a complementary.  Krishna however employed extremely subtle variants of color carried the hollows of a plate going far beyond simple sculptural relief giving as a result a complex web in which light itself becomes the medium of sculpture”.

Stanley William Hayter
Introduction, Krishna Reddy: A Retrospective
Bronx Museum, 1982

Krishna Reddy, Butterfly, 1952 color trial proof

Butterfly, 1952 color trial proof

Elizabeth Catlett (American, 1915-2012)

April 27th, 2015

We are proud to share here an important bronze, El Canto, 1968.  Catlett has taken cues from traditional West African sculpture while creating an iconic, Modern work.  Her works impress with the strength of her formal approach yet Catlett was more interested in the social power they convey: “I have always wanted my art to service my people — to reflect us, to relate to us, to stimulate us, to make us aware of our potential.”

The singer, or singing head is a theme Catlett returned to over the course of her long career.  Elizabeth Catlett ranks among America’s most respected sculptors.  A related work in marble is in the collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Elizabeth Catlett, El Canto 1968, bronze

El Canto 1968, bronze